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Sourced from CISG-online website of the University of Freiburg. See also presentation at <http://www.unidroit.info/mm/TheSwissJudicialSystem.pdf>.

Judicial organisation in Switzerland (Overview)

The CISG has entered into force for Switzerland on 1 January 1991.
Declarations and reservations

Federal court

Bundesgericht (BGer)
Federal Supreme Court; seat in Lausanne

Judicial organisation in the Swiss cantons (Overview)

Aargau

Appenzell Ausserrhoden

Appenzell Innerrhoden

Basel-Landschaft

Basel-Stadt

Bern

Fribourg (Freiburg)

Genève (Genf, Geneva)

Glarus

Graubünden

Jura

Luzern (Lucerne)

Neuchâtel (Neuenburg)

Nidwalden

Obwalden

Schaffhausen

Schwyz

Solothurn

St. Gallen

Thurgau

Ticino (Tessin)

Uri

Valais (Wallis)

Vaud (Waadt)

Zürich

Zug

Note: The overviews displayed here only extend to courts that exercise jurisdiction over international sales contracts under the CISG.

Articles 64 and 64bis of the Swiss Federal Constitution basically attributes legislative competence in civil procedure - including organisation of the courts, judicial procedure and the administration of justice - to the cantons (of which there are 26 in Switzerland). Accordingly, the rules concerning the judicial organisation are to be found in the cantonal codes of civil procedure. They vary considerably from canton to canton.

Article 106 of the Constitution provides for a Federal Court to administer justice in federal matters (the Bundesgericht).

Links:
Bundesgericht


Pace Law School Institute of International Commercial Law - Last updated September 2, 2008
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